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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun Apr 12, 2015 6:25 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Tue Apr 14, 2015 12:53 am



seems the local media forgot to mention the part about mandatory testing ....
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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Wed Apr 15, 2015 12:05 pm

Բ૯ՐՈ \!!

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun Apr 19, 2015 3:17 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun Apr 19, 2015 7:04 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Mon Apr 20, 2015 2:09 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Tue Apr 21, 2015 3:45 am





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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun Apr 26, 2015 6:24 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun Apr 26, 2015 11:21 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Thu May 07, 2015 2:29 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Thu May 14, 2015 1:11 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun May 17, 2015 4:39 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun May 17, 2015 10:45 pm



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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Tue May 19, 2015 2:24 pm

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Wed May 20, 2015 6:15 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Thu May 21, 2015 11:24 pm



understanding existence: roots, religion, and science ....

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22630183.700-falling-meteor-may-have-changed-the-course-of-christianity.html?full=true#.VV6961Ka94I
Quote :
Falling meteor may have changed the course of Christianity

   22 April 2015 by Jacob Aron
   
The early evangelist Paul became a Christian because of a dazzling light on the road to Damascus, but one astronomer thinks it was an exploding meteor

NEARLY two thousand years ago, a man named Saul had an experience that changed his life, and possibly yours as well. According to Acts of the Apostles, the fifth book of the biblical New Testament, Saul was on the road to Damascus, Syria, when he saw a bright light in the sky, was blinded and heard the voice of Jesus. Changing his name to Paul, he became a major figure in the spread of Christianity.

William Hartmann, co-founder of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, has a different explanation for what happened to Paul. He says the biblical descriptions of Paul's experience closely match accounts of the fireball meteor seen above Chelyabinsk, RussiaMovie Camera, in 2013.

Hartmann has detailed his argument in the journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science (doi.org/3vn). He analyses three accounts of Paul's journey, thought to have taken place around AD 35. The first is a third-person description of the event, thought to be the work of one of Jesus's disciples, Luke. The other two quote what Paul is said to have subsequently told others.

"Everything they are describing in those three accounts in the book of Acts are exactly the sequence you see with a fireball," Hartmann says. "If that first-century document had been anything other than part of the Bible, that would have been a straightforward story."

But the Bible is not just any ancient text. Paul's Damascene conversion and subsequent missionary journeys around the Mediterranean helped build Christianity into the religion it is today. If his conversion was indeed as Hartmann explains it, then a random space rock has played a major role in determining the course of history (see "Christianity minus Paul").

That's not as strange as it sounds. A large asteroid impact helped kill off the dinosaurs, paving the way for mammals to dominate the Earth. So why couldn't a meteor influence the evolution of our beliefs?

"It's well recorded that extraterrestrial impacts have helped to shape the evolution of life on this planet," says Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office in Huntsville, Alabama. "If it was a Chelyabinsk fireball that was responsible for Paul's conversion, then obviously that had a great impact on the growth of Christianity."

Hartmann's argument is possible now because of the quality of observations of the Chelyabinsk incident. The 2013 meteor is the most well-documented example of larger impacts that occur perhaps only once in 100 years. Before 2013, the 1908 blast in TunguskaMovie Camera, also in Russia, was the best example, but it left just a scattering of seismic data, millions of flattened trees and some eyewitness accounts. With Chelyabinsk, there is a clear scientific argument to be made, says Hartmann. "We have observational data that match what we see in this first-century account."

Shaping history's arc: the Chelyabinsk meteor (Image: RIA NovostiI/SPL)

The most obvious similarity is the bright light in the sky, "brighter than the sun, shining round me", according to Paul. That's in line with video from Chelyabinsk showing a light, estimated to be around three times as bright as the sun, that created quickly moving shadows as it streaked across the sky.

After witnessing the light, Paul and his companions fell to the ground. Hartmann says they may have been knocked over when the meteor exploded in the sky and generated a shock wave. At Chelyabinsk, the shock wave destroyed thousands of windows and knocked people off their feet.

Paul then heard the voice of Jesus asking why Paul, an anti-Christian zealot to begin with, was persecuting him. The three biblical accounts differ over whether his companions also heard this voice, or a meaningless noise. Chelyabinsk produced a thunderous, explosive sound.

Paul was also blinded, with one account blaming the brightness of the light. A few days later, "something like scales fell from his eye and he regained his sight". Our common idiom for suddenly understanding something stems from this description, but Hartmann says the phrase can be read literally. He suggests that Paul was suffering from photokeratitis, a temporary blindness caused by intense ultraviolet radiation.

"It's basically a bit of sunburn on the cornea of the eye. Once that begins to heal, it flakes off," says Hartmann. "This can be a perfectly literal statement for someone in the first century who doesn't really understand what's happening." The UV radiation at Chelyabinsk was strong enough to cause sunburn, skin peeling and temporary blindness.

Raj Das-Bhaumik of Moorfields Eye Hospital in London says the condition is common among welders whose eyes are exposed to bright sparks, but the symptoms aren't exactly as Hartmann is suggesting. "You wouldn't expect bits of the eye to fall off; I've not come across that at all," he says. It's possible that the thin skin of the eyelids could burn and peel off, he says, but that is unlikely to happen in isolation. "If this were a meteorite, I'm sure you'd have other damage as well."

Mark Bailey of Armagh Observatory in the UK, who previously identified a Tunguska-like event in Brazil in the 1930s, says it's worth analysing old texts for clues to ancient impacts – bearing in mind that accounts are shaped by what people knew at the time. "Sometimes that doesn't make sense to us, but it does make sense if you can reinterpret it." What does he think of Hartmann's argument? "He does a very detailed analysis," says Bailey.

"I would label it as informed speculation – Bill Hartmann is an excellent author," says Cooke. "But like so many other things in the ancient past there is no real concrete evidence, no smoking gun." And with no other accounts from the time to draw on, there is little additional evidence to confirm or disprove the idea.

A search for meteorites in and around Syria could prove fruitful – Chelyabinsk left small chunks all over the region – but even that would be inconclusive. "If a meteorite is discovered in modern Syria in the future, the first thing to test would be how long it's been on the Earth and whether it could potentially be associated with such a recent fall," says Bailey. But even with our best techniques, dating such a rock to the nearest hundred years would be difficult.

Even so, Hartmann believes we need to think seriously about the implications of his idea. "My goal is not to discredit anything that anybody wants to believe in," he says. "But if the spread of a major religion was motivated by misunderstanding a fireball, that's something we human beings ought to understand about ourselves."

This article appeared in print under the headline "Christianity's meteoric rise"
Christianity minus Paul

IF A falling meteor did inspire Paul's conversion to Christianity (see main story), that makes a random event hugely important in the history of humanity. What if Paul hadn't seen the fireball?

"Some scholars call Paul the second founder of Christianity," says Justin Meggitt, a religious historian at the University of Cambridge. At the time, Christianity was a small offshoot of Judaism, but Paul helped preach a version of it that broke with Jewish law.

Paul wasn't the only first-century missionary, and without him Christianity would probably still have separated from Judaism and spread around the world, says Meggitt. But Paul's teachings have endured through the ages, and their absence would be felt.

"People's interpretation of Paul is absolutely fundamental to some of the central figures of Christianity," says Meggitt. For example, Martin Luther, who started the Protestant Reformation in 1517, was heavily inspired by Paul's letters.

Specific predictions about how Christianity and world events would have unfolded without Paul's influence are hard to make, says Meggitt, but "Christianity probably would be very different without him".

http://www.earlywritings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1499&p=34920

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sat May 30, 2015 12:41 pm





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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Mon Jun 01, 2015 6:12 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Mon Jun 01, 2015 11:20 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Wed Jun 03, 2015 2:45 pm



http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jun/03/city-corporates-destroy-best-minds?CMP=fb_gu
Quote :
To seek enlightenment, intellectual or spiritual; to do good; to love and be loved; to create and to teach: these are the highest purposes of humankind. If there is meaning in life, it lies here.

Those who graduate from the leading universities have more opportunity than most to find such purpose. So why do so many end up in pointless and destructive jobs? Finance, management consultancy, advertising, public relations, lobbying: these and other useless occupations consume thousands of the brightest students. To take such jobs at graduation, as many will in the next few weeks, is to amputate life close to its base.

I watched it happen to my peers. People who had spent the preceding years laying out exultant visions of a better world, of the grand creative projects they planned, of adventure and discovery, were suddenly sucked into the mouths of corporations dangling money like angler fish.

At first they said they would do it for a year or two, “until I pay off my debts”. Soon afterwards they added: “and my mortgage”. Then it became, “I just want to make enough not to worry any more”. A few years later, “I’m doing it for my family”. Now, in middle age, they reply, “What, that? That was just a student fantasy.”

   Why should 'bright, critical thinkers' be dispatched on this kamikaze mission?

Why did they not escape, when they perceived that they were being dragged away from their dreams? I have come to see the obscene hours some new recruits must work – sometimes 15 or 16 a day – as a form of reorientation, of brainwashing. You are deprived of the time, sleep and energy you need to see past the place into which you have been plunged. You lose your bearings, your attachments to the world you inhabited before, and become immersed in the culture that surrounds you. Two years of this and many are lost for life.

Employment by the City has declined since the financial crash. Among the universities I surveyed with the excellent researcher John Sheil, the proportion of graduates taking jobs in finance and management consultancy ranges from 5% at Edinburgh to 13% at Oxford, 16% at Cambridge, 28% at the London School of Economics and 60% at the London Business School. But to judge by the number of applications and the rigour of the selection process, these businesses still harvest many of the smartest graduates.

Recruitment begins with lovebombing of the kind that cults use. They sponsor sports teams and debating societies, throw parties, offer meals and drinks, send handwritten letters, use student ambassadors to offer friendship and support. They persuade undergraduates that even if they don’t see themselves as consultants or bankers (few do), these jobs are stepping stones to the careers they really want. They make the initial application easy, and respond immediately and enthusiastically to signs of interest. They offer security and recognition when people are most uncertain and fearful about their future. And there’s the flash of the king’s shilling: the paid internships, the golden hellos, the promise of stupendous salaries within a couple of years. Entrapment is a refined science.

We have but one life. However much money we make, we cannot buy it back. As far as self-direction, autonomy and social utility are concerned, many of those who enter these industries and never re-emerge might as well have locked themselves in a cell at graduation. They lost it all with one false step, taken at a unique moment of freedom.
Graduates throw their mortarboards in the air
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We have but one life. However much money we make, we cannot buy it back.

John Sheil and I sent questions to eight of the universities with the highest average graduate salaries: Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, the LSE, the London Business School, Warwick, Sheffield and Edinburgh. We asked whether they seek to counter these lavish recruitment drives and defend students from the love blitz. With one remarkable exception, their responses ranged from feeble to dismal. Most offered no evidence of any prior interest in these questions. Where we expected deep deliberation to have taken place, we found instead an intellectual vacuum.

They cited their duty of impartiality, which, they believe, prevents them from seeking to influence students’ choices, and explained that there were plenty of other careers on offer. But they appear to have confused impartiality with passivity. Passivity in the face of unequal forces is anything but impartial. Impartiality demands an active attempt to create balance, to resist power, to tell the dark side of the celestial tale being pummelled into the minds of undergraduates by the richest City cults.

Oxford University asked us, “isn’t it preferable that [the City] recruits bright, critical thinkers and socially engaged graduates who are smart enough to hold their employers to account when possible?”. Oh blimey. This is a version of the most desperate excuse my college friends attempted: “I’ll reform them from within.” This magical thinking betrays a profound misconception about the nature and purpose of such employers.

They respond to profit, the regulatory environment, the demands of shareholders, not to the consciences of their staff. We all know how they treat whistleblowers. Why should “bright, critical thinkers and socially engaged graduates” be dispatched on this kamikaze mission? I believe these universities are failing in their duty of care.

   Students! Follow your dreams, however hard it may be, however uncertain success might seem

The hero of this story is Gordon Chesterman, head of the careers service at Cambridge, and the only person we spoke to who appears to have given some thought to these questions. He told me his service tries to counter the influence of the richest employers.

It sends out regular emails telling students “if you don’t want to become a banker, you’re not a failure”, and runs an event called “But I don’t want to work in the City”. It imposes a fee on rich recruiters and uses the money to pay the train fares of nonprofits. He expressed anger about being forced by the government to provide data on graduate starting salaries.

“I think it’s a very blunt and inappropriate means [of comparison], that rings alarm bells in my mind.”

Elsewhere, at this vulnerable, mutable, pivotal moment, undergraduates must rely on their own wavering resolve to resist peer pressure, the herd instinct, the allure of money, flattery, prestige and security.

Students, rebel against these soul-suckers! Follow your dreams, however hard it may be, however uncertain success might seem.
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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Fri Jun 05, 2015 12:38 am




.... and dense as much?
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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sun Jun 07, 2015 5:58 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Sat Jun 20, 2015 12:26 am

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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Mon Jun 22, 2015 1:10 pm

oh, maestro:  

http://townhall.com/news/politics-elections/2015/06/22/east-german-hard-currency-maestro-schalckgolodkowski-dies-n2015818
Quote :
BERLIN (Reuters) - The man who persuaded a Cold War conservative leader in West Germany to save Communist East Germany from insolvency has died in Bavaria, where he fled just after the Berlin Wall came down.

In 1983, Alexander Schalck-Golodkowski convinced Bavarian state premier Franz Josef Strauss, an ardent anti-communist and former Defense Minister, to lend his nearly bankrupt country a billion of West Germany's marks, prized as an enviably hard currency.

As the head of East Germany's "Kommerzielle Koordierung" (KoKo) section controlled by the Stasi security police, Schalck-Golodkowski raised some 25 billion marks for the Communist state before its collapse in 1989, including through selling political prisoners. West Germany paid for the release of 34,000 people jailed for crimes such as trying to flee to the West.

"Alexander Schalck-Golodkowski died on June 21, just a few days before his 83rd birthday, in a Munich hospital after a long fight against cancer," his publisher Edition Ost said.

"As a deputy foreign trade minister in East Germany, he was one of the secret negotiators in German-German relations. His successful work as head of 'KoKo' earned him the nickname 'Devisenbeschaffer' (foreign currency procurer)."

Schalck-Golodkowski fled to West Berlin with his wife in December 1989 and reports said he cooperated with the West German BND intelligence agency. He was quoted saying he fled from East Germany because he feared for his life.

A heavyset man who stood 1.90 meters tall, Schalck-Golodkowski later turned himself in to justice authorities and spent several weeks in investigative custody. He was repeatedly investigated but never sent to jail.

He settled near the Alps in the town of Rottach-Egern.

"If things ever get too tight for you, my house will always be open for you," the conservative Strauss told him, according to a 2012 book "Der Mann, der die DDR retten wollte" (The man who wanted to save East Germany). Strauss died in 1988, two years before Germany was united on Oct. 3, 1990.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvb0qUlwFrs


and what a coincidence: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/06/21/us-pope-turin-arms-idUSKBN0P10U220150621
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PostSubject: Re: testing the otherized op-position   Tue Jun 23, 2015 7:10 am

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