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Dako
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PostSubject: The Canadian War Machine   Wed Feb 18, 2009 11:41 am



The Canadian War Machine


Canada is a highly self-deceived country. Canadians believe two highly untrue "facts" about Canada. Both of these inaccuracies are mentioned in this comic Canadian song, Canada's Really Big,

"the economy is lousy/
we barely have an army"


http://youtube.com/watch?v=9vxDDcTc64c&


The Canadian occupation of Afghanistan...

By 2006, Canada had begun a major role in the more dangerous southern part of the country for the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). A battle group of more than 2,000 soldiers called Operation Athena was based around Kandahar.

For six months ending Nov. 1, 2006, Canada also held the command of one of the main military forces in the area, called Multi National Brigade for Command South. During this time, Operation Medusa, a major offensive against insurgents in Kandahar province, was launched.

The fighting grew fiercer and the casualty count began to rise. By mid-January 2008, 108 Canadian military personnel had died in the country.

There are today roughly 2500 Canadian troops in Afghanistan, committed until 2011.

The issue of civilians killed by foreign military forces is causing tension between these forces and Afghans...

-March 14, 2006 Canadian troops in Kandahar open fire on a taxi, killing one of its passengers, Nasrat Ali Hassan.
-August 22, 2006 A 10 year old boy riding as a passenger on a motorcycle is shot and killed by Canadian troops in Kandahar.
-December 12, 2006 An elderly motorcyclist was shot and killed by Canadian troops in Kandahar.
-February 17, 2007 An unarmed man acting in a suspicious manner was shot and killed by Canadian troops near the village of Senjaray 12 km west of Kandahar.
-February 18, 2007 Canadian troops mistakenly gunned down an Afghan National Police officer and a homeless beggar after their convoy was ambushed in Kandahar City late Sunday.
-February 27, 2007 Canadian troops fire at a Toyota car that failed to stop at a security cordon around a broken down Canadian vehicle in the Kandahar area. One occupant is killed, the other is wounded. No weapons or bombs were found.
-September 19, 2007 One Afghan civilian and several others wounder in a traffic collision with a Canadian convoy.
-October 2, 2007 A man on a motorcycle is killed and a child riding behing him is wounded by Canadian troops in Kandahar.
-November 15, 2007 A man in a taxi is killed and another wounded when they were shot at in Kandahar by Canadian troops riding in a convoy.
-January 30, 2008 - Three civilians showed up at a Kandahar hospital with gunshot wounds, claiming they had been shot at by a Canadian convoy. One of them later died of his injuries.
-July 27, 2008 - Canadian troops opened fire on a vehicle that came too close to a Canadian convoy in Kandahar. A two-year-old girl and her four-year-old brother were killed and the father of the two children was wounded.
-September 18, 2008 - Canadian soldiers in a convoy fire at a civilian truck in Kandahar, killing one of the occupants.

[Note: this represents only reported civilian killings over only one-and-a-half years of an eight year occupation.]

The Globe and Mail recently published a series of interviews with prisoners who had been captured by Canadians before being turned over to the Afghan authorities. The 30 prisoners told stories of savage beatings and gross mistreatment. Mahmad Gul, 33, reportedly said: "The Canadians told me, 'Give them real information, or they will do more bad things to you.'"

Total casualties (2001-2002) According to Jonathan Steele of The Guardian between 20,000 and 49,600 people may have died of the consequences of the invasion.

Total casualties (2006) The UN suggests that more than 3,700 people have died in 2006.



Canada has one of the worlds highest military budgets, nearly double Israel's...

List of countries by military expenditures, USD

World Total 1,200,000,000,000

NATO Total 849,875,309,000

1 United States 623,000,000,000

(European Union Total 300,745,000,000)

2 France 71,018,000,000
3 United Kingdom 65,093,500,000
4 China 56,240,000,000
5 Germany 52,400,000,000
6 Japan 46,240,000,000
7 Russia 36,800,000,000
8 Italy 32,600,000,000
9 Saudi Arabia 30,150,000,000
10 South Korea 29,531,400,000
11 Brazil 24,417,000,000
12 India 24,330,000,000
13 Australia 19,441,000,000

14 Canada 16,900,000,000

19 Israel 9,444,000,000

24 Iran 6,300,000,000

33 South Africa 3,700,000,000

39 Algeria 2,994,000,000

54 Philippines 1,348,000,000
55 Indonesia 1,300,000,000
56 Libya 1,300,000,000

63 Syria 858,000,000

70 Cuba 694,000,000

73 Sri Lanka 606,200,000

74 Sudan 587,000,000

106 Zimbabwe 124,700,000

107 Afghanistan 122,400,000

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Figures

1 United States 540,700,000,000
2 United Kingdom 58,400,000,000
3 France 53,100,000,000
4 People's Republic of China 49,500,000,000
5 Japan 42,700,000,000
6 Germany 37,000,000,000
7 Russia 34,200,000,000
8 Italy 28,100,000,000
9 Saudi Arabia 27,200,000,000
10 India 24,100,000,000
11 South Korea 23,900,000,000
12 Australia 14,100,000,000

13 Canada 13,200,000,000
14 Brazil 12,800,000,000

15 Spain 12,300,000,000



Canada has one of the most well equipped militaries...

Canadian Forces
Forces canadiennes


Military Manpower

Regular Force approx. 62,000
Primary Reserve approx. 25, 000
Fleet Submarines 4
Destroyers 3
Frigates 12
Main Battle Tanks 66 Leopard C2, 100 Leopard 2 entering service
Infantry fighting vehicles 650+
Armoured Personnel Carriers 1,000+
Fighters 98, CF-18A/B Hornet
Patrol aircraft 21
Transport aircraft 83
Helicopters 142



Canada is deeply embedded in the U.S. War Machine...

The pretense that the Canadian government actually opted out of a particular U.S. war, should be laughable. Canadian military contractors are completely integrated into the U.S. military procurement system. In fact, the U.S.-Canada Defence Production Sharing Agreements, officially spell out Canadian industrial subservience to U.S. military needs: Canada's military contractors are considered part of the U.S. defence industrial base and are actually defined as U.S. domestic sources of supply.


Canada is one of the world's largest arms exporters, exporting to questionable regimes...

According to the most recent government report released in November, during 2002 Canada exported $678.3-million in military goods to 68 countries.

The majority of the weapons shipments went to like-minded governments, but transfers also were made to countries at war and to countries whose governments were involved in human rights violations against domestic populations.

Because the report again omitted weapons sales to the US, the reported total value of all military exports for 2002 was less than one-third the value estimated.

Regional distribution of reported Canadian arms exports
(Values in millions of constant 2002 dollars)

Region
2002 value

Latin America 16.6
Europe 381.1
Middle East 58
Asia 106.5
Oceania 112.3
Africa 3.8
Total678.3

Canada exported military goods valued at $100,000 or more to seven countries hosting armed conflicts in 2002: Algeria, Colombia, India, Israel, Nigeria, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka.

Country
Armed Conflict 2002?
Serious humans rights violations 2002?
Value of Canadian arms shipments

Algeria
Yes
Yes
$122,400

Brazil
No
Yes
$217,305

Colombia
Yes
Yes
$680,500

India
Yes
Yes
$2,700,000

Israel
Yes
Yes
$3,512,845

Jamaica
No
Yes
$746,477

Mexico
No
Yes
$430,000

Nigeria
Yes
Yes
$460,275


Philippines
Yes
Yes
$344,121

Saudi Arabia
No
Yes
$49,795,495

Sri Lanka
Yes
Yes
$172,112

Turkey
No
Yes
$1,113,561

The total value of reported Canadian arms exports, equivalent to $432-million in 2002 US dollars, would place Canada among the largest 10 global arms suppliers for 2002. Canada's ranking among the largest international arms suppliers would climb even higher if the value of unreported arms exports were added to reported sales. A full accounting of 2002 Canadian arms exports would place Canada as the fifth largest global arms supplier in the CRS ranking, immediately following the top tier suppliers: the United States, Russia, France, and the United Kingdom. The substantial volume of Canadian military goods exports to the US is by far the largest omission from the annual government report, it is possible to estimate total 2002 Canadian military exports to the US as $1,312.7-million.



Canada contributes little to global peace-keeping...

Peace Keeping Ranking of Military and Police Contributions to UN Operations

1 ) Pakistan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,173
2 ) Bangladesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,675
3 ) India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,471
4 ) Nepal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,626
5 ) Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,564
6 ) Ghana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,907
7 ) Uruguay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,583
8 ) Italy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,539
9 ) Nigeria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,465
10 ) France . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,975

60 ) Zimbabwe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

61 ) Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

62 ) Burkina Faso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133



"Depleted" Uranium Munitions originate in Canada...

"There is absolutely no doubt that every bit of depleted uranium (in the munitions used in the Balkans) has Canadian uranium in it," says Gordon Edwards, president of the Montreal-based Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility.

Last March, NATO revealed that its forces dropped about 31,000 depleted-uranium bombs or shells during the 78-day campaign in Kosovo in 1999. NATO also acknowledges that it used depleted-uranium ammunition in Bosnia in 1994-95. [Note, see also Afghanistan and Iraq figures.]

Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, according to Statistics Canada data. [75% of global total.]



Canadians fight in Iraq...

In 2003, Canada refused to take part in the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Concurrently, Canada deployed some additional troops to the War on Terrorism in Afghanistan. Some claim that it incidentally freed up some American and British troops for assignment in Iraq. Canada continues to have warships in the Persian Gulf area as part of Operation Altair. Their presence is justified by Canada's commitment to Operation Enduring Freedom. Small numbers of Canadian soldiers on exchange to American units participated in the invasion of Iraq. There are Canadian military bases in Saudi Arabia, undisclosed in Canadian media.


Canada, one of the World's wealthiest countries...

G7: United States, Japan, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy and Canada
G8: United States, Japan, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Canada and Russia


...the leading suppliers of U.S. oil in Nov. 2007 were:

Canada, 2.431 million barrels per day

Saudi Arabia, 1.620 million barrels per day
Mexico, 1.581 million barrels per day
Venezuela, 1.381 million barrels per day
Nigeria, 1.306 million barrels per day.


GDP nominal (millions of USD)

1 United States 13,194,700
2 Japan 4,366,459
3 Germany 2,915,867
4 China 2,644,6422
5 United Kingdom 2,398,946
6 France 2,252,213
7 Italy 1,852,585

8 Canada 1,275,273

9 Spain 1,225,750
10 Brazil 1,067,706


GDP - per capita (PPP)

1 Luxembourg $ 80,800
2 Qatar $ 75,900
3 Bermuda $ 69,900
4 Jersey $ 57,000
5 Norway $ 55,600
6 Kuwait $ 55,300
7 United Arab Emirates $ 55,200
8 Singapore $ 48,900
9 United States $ 46,000
10 Ireland $ 45,600
11 Guernsey $ 44,600
12 Equatorial Guinea $ 44,100 .
13 Cayman Islands $ 43,800
14 Hong Kong $ 42,000
15 Switzerland $ 39,800
16 Iceland $ 39,400
17 Austria $ 39,000
18 Andorra $ 38,800
19 Netherlands $ 38,600
20 British Virgin Islands $ 38,500

21 Canada $ 38,200

50 Korea, South $ 24,600

151 Morocco $ 3,800

166 Pakistan $ 2,600

[Canada's mean income is higher than the U.S.'s.]


Largest World Economies

Country GDP $US billions

1 USA 10,208
2 Japan 4,149
3 Germany 1,847
4 United Kingdom 1,424
5 France 1,307
6 China (exc.HK) 1,159
7 Italy 1,089

8 Canada 700

9 Mexico 618
10 Spain 582
11 Brazil 504
12 India 481
13 Korea 422
14 Netherlands 380
15 Australia 357
16 Russian Federation 310
17 Taiwan 282
18 Argentina 269
19 Switzerland 247
20 Belgium 227


Google for sources.
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PostSubject: Re: The Canadian War Machine   Sat Mar 07, 2009 7:32 pm

Thanks for that it is a revelation, you do not generally consider Canada in those terms. Talk about the quiet achiever, or should that be deceiver. Given that Canada is assured security due to its common boarder with the U.S. what are they spending the military buck on and why?
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PostSubject: Re: The Canadian War Machine   Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:39 pm

Sonofgloin wrote:
Thanks for that it is a revelation, you do not generally consider Canada in those terms. Talk about the quiet achiever, or should that be deceiver. Given that Canada is assured security due to its common boarder with the U.S. what are they spending the military buck on and why?
http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/cdnmilitary/

"He said the announcement was the first step in a larger plan to revamp Canada's military, a force that has been criticized by the U.S. and other NATO allies as underfunded.

In the 2005 budget, the Liberal government promised a nearly $13-billion boost in military spending for the next five years. The Conservatives' budget in 2006 allocated $1.1 billion to the Canadian military over two years, as part of $5.3 billion in funding coming over the next five years.

As well, during the last week of June 2006, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced $15 billion in spending on military vehicles, including transport planes, heavy-lift helicopters, troop carrier ships and trucks. The spending will be spread out over several years.

Canada's military budget for 2008 was $18.2 billion. It's projected to reach $19 billion next year. In the 2008 budget, the government pledged to increase military spending by two per cent a year for 20 years, starting in 2011, which would add an additional $12 billion over those 20 years."


Here is a report on Canadian federal spending for 2004, (most recent I see just now),

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_federal_spending,_2004

The "National Defence" number is in close agreement with the numbers in the OP.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2008/10/09/afghanistan-cost-report.html

"The military mission in Afghanistan could cost a total of $18.1 billion or $1,500 per Canadian household by 2011, according to a government report that also criticized how financial records are being kept.

Canada has spent $7.7 billion to $10.5 billion on costs related to its mission in the past six years, and may spend $13.9 billion to $18.1 billion by the end of the 2010-11 budget year....

However, a lack of government consistency and transparency has made the figures difficult to estimate...."


Australia and Canada have almost identical millitary expenditure. Don't forget the Canadians are still occupying Haiti too (Canada's East Timor)...

http://dissidentsphilosophy.alldiscussion.net/sociology-f10/how-an-ngo-works-t159.htm#2825
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