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Dako
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PostSubject: Interview with wonderer   Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:16 pm



Interview with wonderer

Part I

Hello! And thank-you for responding to my invite to interview famous ephilosophers! In Part One of the interview, I thought to ask some very general questions, just to let your readers, and those less familiar with you philosophy, get to now some of the basics. So without further adieu....


So, why philosophy? How does one get to that point?


And how did you get into ephilosophy in particular?


Is there a philosophical movement that you associate -- or disassociate -- yourself from, say Platonism, or Existentialism; do you have a favorite main-stream philosopher?


Discussions can get heated. You must have tough skin?


Are there any social issues you are passionate about, anti-abortion, prison reform, anything like that?


has to be carried out via a PC. A PC burns the equivalent of about 2 kilos of coal an hour. Half the World's electricity comes from coal. Does this concern you? That ephilosophy could be contributing to Global Warming?


"Between grief and nothing, what would you choose?" Breathless (1983)
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PostSubject: Re: Interview with wonderer   Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:14 pm

Dako wrote:


So, why philosophy? How does one get to that point?
I've been asking questions and analysing things for as long as i can remember. I moved around a lot and there was never a shortage of things to think about. As a kid i would even think about why i think so much and didn't just live in the moment like thsoe around me. When i got to university i took some basic philosophy and logic courses and found that most of it was just putting names on things i had already considered. Since then i've enjoyed analysing things and discussing these things online rather than with a few friends. Philosophy is enjoyable, analysing things is anyway. Useful too...
Dako wrote:


And how did you get into ephilosophy in particular?
when i enrolled myself in philosophy courses i decided to check out the internet community. I started on a site called "madphilosophers" which recently went off line for reasons unknown to me. I moved to ILP which i preferred simply because there is more traffic and more opportunity for discussion. I simply enjoy philosophy, and internet forums are a great place to excercise the old noggen.

Dako wrote:

Is there a philosophical movement that you associate -- or disassociate -- yourself from, say Platonism, or Existentialism; do you have a favorite main-stream philosopher?

I'm not really sympathetic to any one philosopher or movement. I am partial to pragmatism, if you consider that a philosophy.
Dako wrote:

Discussions can get heated. You must have tough skin?
feelings can come into play, that's when i look at my Spock poster (i don't really have one)
Dako wrote:


Are there any social issues you are passionate about, anti-abortion, prison reform, anything like that?
Well i tend to support equality. Anything which i see as an injustice i am liable to get passionate about.

Dako wrote:

has to be carried out via a PC. A PC burns the equivalent of about 2 kilos of coal an hour. Half the World's electricity comes from coal. Does this concern you? That ephilosophy could be contributing to Global Warming?
well not really, considering my contribution is a fraction of a fraction of the real sources of energy consumption.

The difference i make is small, and the anguish i feel because of it is small. Nobody is perfect.

Dako wrote:

"Between grief and nothing, what would you choose?" Breathless (1983)

Are those my only options?

If grief is a better option than nothing, would you still call it grief to take that option?

I would choose grief, afterall you cannot experience grief without also having experienced pleasure.

Grief by definition is the mourning of a loss.
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PostSubject: Re: Interview with wonderer   Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:43 pm



Part II

This is Part Two of Interview with wonderer. Let's follow up on a few of his replies from Part One, and delve a little deeper into the mind of one of the 'net's more prolific ephilosophers.


wonderer wrote:
As a kid i would even think about why i think so much and didn't just live in the moment like those around me.
Shall we linger on this point a moment? Childhood is sometimes a very philosophical time of life. Were there any specific childhood experiences that set your philosophy for the future, or that you think 'made you a philosopher'?

Quote :
Philosophy is enjoyable...

I simply enjoy philosophy...
How? Some parts of philosophy are very terrifying and frightening? What would you advise your readers about that part of philosophy?


Quote :
I am partial to pragmatism....
Mental illness has been an issue for the ephilosophy community, and philosophers in general. Do you think that pragmatism is a mind-healthy philosophy, or was it only coincidence that Jeremy Bentham had so many problems with mental illness? How do you stay sane?


Some of your readers may know that you are based in Canada. What's that like, beyond just cold? Is there a Canadian style of philosophy? Can you speak French or a Native American language?


And very interesting -- what are your thoughts on aboriginal liberation movements in general?


Chet Zar. It looks a bit creepy. What attracts you to this artist? Is there a work or collection that most intrigues you?


You were recently nominated "Best Social Sciences Poster". That must make you feel good? (Note: kriswest "Most liked" -- and I got "Most Hated"!?) What makes an internet personality popular and likable?


And in keeping with the forum theme, what does dissidence mean to you?


"As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives.
Each wife had seven sacks,
Each sack had seven cats,
Each cat had seven kits.
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were going to St. Ives?"
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PostSubject: Re: Interview with wonderer   Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:25 pm

Dako wrote:

Shall we linger on this point a moment? Childhood is sometimes a very philosophical time of life. Were there any specific childhood experiences that set your philosophy for the future, or that you think 'made you a philosopher'?
it wasn't really a single event, as i've said i hav always had an analytical mind...

You could say we were not upper or middle class, a lot of my early childhood angst came from the differences between my home life and what school made it seem like life should be. Perhaps that contributed to my continued questioning.

One series of events that has shaped some of my philosophies is the differing ideas i was told about God. I was told 5 different stories from 15 differernt people, and ended up concluding that they were all full of it.

I'm agnostic when it comes to God, and when anyone tries to tell me what's what concerning divinity i'm usually too suspicious to begin a discussion.
Dako wrote:

Quote :
Philosophy is enjoyable...

I simply enjoy philosophy...
How? Some parts of philosophy are very terrifying and frightening? What would you advise your readers about that part of philosophy?
what is there to be afraid of?

what could possibly scare you just by learning it?

Perhaps really really boring propositional logic? Laughing

Most of the darker sides to philosohpy which tend to arise from some form of nihilism are just as presumptuous as religion can be. Religion is the justification of "a big happy" and nihilism can be the justification fo "a big happy".

Pragmatically, you just close the book Smile (after reading it of course)

Dako wrote:

Quote :
I am partial to pragmatism....
Mental illness has been an issue for the ephilosophy community, and philosophers in general. Do you think that pragmatism is a mind-healthy philosophy, or was it only coincidence that Jeremy Bentham had so many problems with mental illness? How do you stay sane?
pragmatism can easily be led astray. I tend to use it in small doses.

Pragmatism can justify lobotomies but decisions of importance metir more than a passing judgement like practicality.

pragmatism is more of a logical tactic than a philosophy.

Dako wrote:

Some of your readers may know that you are based in Canada. What's that like, beyond just cold? Is there a Canadian style of philosophy? Can you speak French or a Native American language?


And very interesting -- what are your thoughts on aboriginal liberation movements in general?
we actually have warm summers, but cold winters. Canada is a nice place, not many guns and the people are nice (not to rub it in America). pretty much the same old boring suburbia you see on soap operas...

I speak French, and am learning Mandrian Chinese, languages are one of my long terms goals actually, spanish and german are next on my list.

Concerning the aboriginal equal rights movements, we canadians odon't have much to say, the media tends to downplay these things. I am a supperter of equal rights, and the aboriginal community is definitely an opressed one.

I'm no activist or social worker, but the state of things in canada is in many ways shameful to our so called multiculturalism.

Dako wrote:

Chet Zar. It looks a bit creepy. What attracts you to this artist? Is there a work or collection that most intrigues you?
i like "crybaby" and "double whammy" to name two off the top of my head.

There is nothing special about them other than that they simply speak to me. When i look at his pictures, it's almost as if i can understand what he is saying with the picture.

Most of his pictures involve illustrating absurd emotions on absurd visages, which for some reason echoes reality all to well.
Dako wrote:

You were recently nominated "Best Social Sciences Poster". That must make you feel good? (Note: kriswest "Most liked" -- and I got "Most Hated"!?) What makes an internet personality popular and likable?
likeability isn't really a trait i associate with being a good philosopher, though it can seriously help or hinder the way people persiece a philosophy.

I don't think i'll win best social sciences poster, but if i do i would like it to be for my sociological mind.

Dako wrote:

And in keeping with the forum theme, what does dissidence mean to you?
Opposition to an idea. Logical criticism.
Dako wrote:


"As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives.
Each wife had seven sacks,
Each sack had seven cats,
Each cat had seven kits.
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were going to St. Ives?"

2800?
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PostSubject: Re: Interview with wonderer   Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:38 am



Part III

Notwithstanding anything further you think your readers might be interested to know about you, or any questions from readers, this is the third and final segment of Interview with wonderer. This has been a really fascinating opportunity to learn about one of the most recognizable names in ephilosophy. Dissidents Philosophy Forum extends a warm and hearty thank-you for your participation in this exploration of the little known, and even less: understood, world of ephilosophy.

wonderer wrote:
...a lot of my early childhood angst came from the differences between my home life and what school made it seem like life should be.
You had a hard time in school growing up?

Quote :
...we canadians don't have much to say, the media tends to downplay these things. I am a supperter of equal rights, and the aboriginal community is definitely an opressed one.

...the state of things in canada is in many ways shameful to our so called multiculturalism.
Assuming Aboriginal people exactly do not want "equal rights", but autonomy; would you be opposed to breaking up Canada into several smaller countries? There has been a movement in French Quebec to this effect.

Quote :
- What does dissidence mean to you?

Opposition to an idea. Logical criticism.
That sounds very abstract. Such is philosophy? Or is there a real dimension to philosophy as well? For example, later in life Jean-Paul Sartre became a vocal spokesman for decolonization.

Quote :
- "As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives.
Each wife had seven sacks,
Each sack had seven cats,
Each cat had seven kits.
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were going to St. Ives?"


2800?
Just like a philosopher to answer a question with a question! Do you want to change your answer?


ephilosophy is a turn-based strategy game. Do you think real-time mediums like Live Chat could ever replace the Bulletin Board System as the dominant format of philosophy discussion on the internet?


Are you afflicted by visions of death and God?


Do books like Sophie's World, or the proliferation of philosophy discussion boards, threaten to democratize or 'water-down' philosophy?


Do the past and the future exist?


Last edited by Dako on Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:14 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Interview with wonderer   Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:13 pm

Dako wrote:


wonderer wrote:
...a lot of my early childhood angst came from the differences between my home life and what school made it seem like life should be.
You had a hard time in school growing up?
I did not have an easy time, but it was not overly difficult. Sometimes I consider myself lucky that i was able to come out of it with a stable mind, and other times I wonder if I didn't have the life i did i might be just as emotionally driven as most other people...

Specifics are irrelevant, let's just say i was fed with a coarse spoon.
Dako wrote:


Quote :
...we canadians don't have much to say, the media tends to downplay these things. I am a supporter of equal rights, and the aboriginal community is definitely an opressed one.

...the state of things in canada is in many ways shameful to our so called multiculturalism.
Assuming Aboriginal people exactly do not want "equal rights", but autonomy; would you be opposed to breaking up Canada into several smaller countries? There has been a movement in French Quebec to this effect.
The quebec seperatists are bitter towards english speakers. The idea of quebec seperating is just impractical.

There is a moral issue concerning aboriginal rights or autonomy. When "the white man" moved to america we murdered and stole land from people that were already here.

So do canadians have a right to keep this land? do americans have a right to keep this land?

for fairness, we should pick up and leave the continent, but this is impractical just as dividing the country is impractiacal.

The abroginal way of life is destroyed, reviving it is impossible.
Dako wrote:


Quote :
- What does dissidence mean to you?

Opposition to an idea. Logical criticism.
That sounds very abstract. Such is philosophy? Or is there a real dimension to philosophy as well? For example, later in life Jean-Paul Sartre became a vocal spokesman for decolonization.
i'm not sure what you mean. If sartre contradicted his earler philosophies by saying this then i would have no objection.

No part of philosophy or logic is accepted as "right" or "absolute truth".

Let's say i have to decide a method to choose my fate. some people say that we should measure all options, and then choose the outcome with the least worst possible outcome, others might say to choose the one with the best possible outcome.

Different tactics have different functions and goals, different levels of effectiveness. Sartre criticizing himself is not good for his earlier philosophies, but says nothing about philosophy or logic.
Dako wrote:


Quote :
- "As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives.
Each wife had seven sacks,
Each sack had seven cats,
Each cat had seven kits.
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were going to St. Ives?"


2800?
Just like a philosopher to answer a question with a question! Do you want to change your answer?
no i've thought about it and the answer is 2800.

there are 2800 kits cats sacks and wives.

Dako wrote:


ephilosophy is a turn-based strategy game. Do you think real-time mediums like Live Chat could ever replace the Bulletin Board System as the dominant format of philosophy discussion on the internet?
philosophy doesn't have to be a competition, sometimes philosophers pit themselves against eachother in an effort to find out whose arguments and conclusions are more secure or more effective or more accurate, but this is not a prerequisite.

Philosophy might change venues of expression but a dominant venue observes nothing of the content.

Personally i would wonder about what effects different mediums have on productivity, content and other things...

Dako wrote:


Are you afflicted by visions of death and God?
I wouldn't say afflicted... Sometimes I imagine myself on my death bed, and I see myself peacefully letting go...

Of course I have had more disturbing visions earlier in my life, but thanks to philosophy the dissionance has subsided.

Dako wrote:


Do books like Sophie's World, or the proliferation of philosophy discussion boards, threaten to democratize or 'water-down' philosophy?
something can be said for democrtization, but it's a poorly chosen word for the phenomenon.

When you think of the classic philosophers, they each compiled various works of literature which are very well written. that is they invested a lot of time in them.

The way things take place on these ecommunities is different. Instead of writing your own theories alone, you share and develop them with numerous strangers.

This is a good thing i think, the mixing and competition between ideas is sure to produce some developments, but weighing the cons against that makes a good case as well. Many bright ideas can become crushed by a majority opposition, and as history has taught us many of our best breakthroughs were opposed at first.

If the philosophers of old could have, I bet they would be posting on these sites religiously...

Dako wrote:


Do the past and the future exist?

Yesterday is todays memory, tomorrow is todays dream. - Kahlil Gibran

If they exist, they are out of reach... What is to come will exist, what has past has existed.

Go much further beyond that and we will find ourselves guessing at the unknown.

Been a pleasure,

Wonderer.
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PostSubject: Re: Interview with wonderer   Sun Feb 15, 2009 2:34 am

Thank-you again wonderer for your participation is this project to get to know some of the big names in ephilosophy.

This has been highly informative, and also entertaining. DPF has more questions now than at the beginning. However, we shall keep those for the threads...
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